Tag Archives: relationships

On #metoo… From a Friend

I pieced this together from a recent tweet by @rachelheldevans. I felt it was a great thread, not only from a Christian perspective, but from a female perspective as well. Christian men, we’d do well to listen…

This week: 1 James Dobson encouraged Christians to fast & pray for the protection  of a serial sex abuser (Trump). 2 When a mega-church pastor’s criminal sexual assault was exposed, he received a standing ovation from his congregation. 3 One of Roy Moore’s victims’ house burned down.
All of these stories point to why I’m sadly pessimistic about a #metoo-style cultural shift in evangelical Christianity (and, to an extent, the broader Church). I’m pessimistic because of the deadly combination of patriarchy & (as discussed recently) evangelical exceptionalism.
As I’ve stated before, evangelical exceptionalism understands “the world” or “the culture” to be filled with darkness & sin, teeming with people who are “lost,” and evangelicalism & evangelicals to be the sole bearers of light, the counter-cultural path to salvation.
White evangelicals perceive “the world” to struggle with racism & sexual immorality, but not themselves. Because of this, it’s rare to see serious efforts made at examining the ways racism & toxic masculinity/patriarchy are embedded in evangelical culture.
You see this so clearly in the fact that Andy Savage’s church rejects LGBT people, yet gives their abusive pastor a standing ovation! (This points to the reality that anti-LGBT sentiment is usually more about prejudice than a commitment to “sexual purity.”).
The fact is, evangelical culture (and, generally speaking, the Church culture at large) remains mired in patriarchy. So someone who is perceived as a “man of God” doing “God’s work” will almost always be protected over women & children. It happens. All. The. Time.
When Savage’s victim came forward, who did she face? Who was in charge of her church? Men. All men. When churches sideline women from leadership, a culture of patriarchy is inevitable and toxic, abusive masculinity can flourish.
But you won’t see many churches challenging patriarchy or abuse or toxic masculinity in Christian culture. Instead, you hear sermon after sermon railing against immodesty, cohabitation, sex before marriage, LGBT people – all those real or perceived “sins of the culture”.
In order to turn #metoo into #churchtoo, the Church in America, and specifically evangelicals, are going to have to muster some humility and take a serious look at how patriarchy, sexism, and toxic masculinity have infected their culture.
It’s great to see women like @BethMooreLPM & @KayWarren1 speaking out. But as long as church leadership & evangelical culture are dominated by men (who believe God wants it that way!) I fear the voices of women & victims will not be heard and nothing will change.
TLDR version: In the name of Jesus, smash the damn patriarchy.

…So I feel like this thread was too pessimistic and Oprah says we should be hopeful. So some hopeful thoughts: While the Church in America is perhaps not positioned to lead the charge against sexual harassment & toxic masculinity. There are some significant generational differences within the Church, including evangelicalism, that suggest attitudes are changing on gender & sexuality. I’m hopeful this means more introspective conversations about consent, inclusion, & patriarchy in the near future.
Also, our present cultural moment, as tough as it’s been, seems to have emboldened some voices of dissent among evangelical women. If evangelicals yield to their wisdom, there’s hope.

Advertisements

On Hanegraaff and Orthodox Christianity: Or, a Church Service Worth Attending

Hank Hanegraaff, the “Bible Answer Man”, has recently converted to Eastern Orthodox Christianity and apparently this is causing quite a stir in the evangelical community.

On returning from a trip to China several years ago, Hanegraaff remarked, “I saw Chinese Christians who were deeply in love with the Lord, and I learned that while they may not have had as much intellectual acumen or knowledge as I did, they had life. I was comparing my ability to communicate truth with their deep and abiding love for the Lord Jesus Christ.”

“Since that time,” he added, “I’ve been impacted by the whole idea of knowing Jesus Christ, experiencing Jesus Christ, and partaking of the graces of Jesus Christ through the Lord’s Table.”

One of the recent articles I read on the subject was from Ed Stetzer. Writing on Christianity Today’s website, the focus of his article was on the possible reasons why the Orthodox liturgy is so appealing to evangelicals today. One of the things he says is,

The early church was indeed more focused on the Eucharist and was more liturgical in structure, nature, and expression. There are things we can learn from that today, but we have to also acknowledge that much of what we see was, indeed, cultural. As a missiologist, I’m not drawn into early Christian cultural forms and am concerned that some are equating them with eternal truth.
The evangelical bent towards Western individualism has opened the door to an ‘every Bible for itself’ mentality where, combined with the digital age, rogue armchair theologians can be equipped with major influence without proper ecclesiological accountability. It’s a bit of a “me version” world of Bible translation. Lacking a central definition and protection of truth can cause (and has caused) much of evangelicalism’s problems.
In Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy, that is not typically the case. In these church structures, there are tighter reigns on vetting truth and defining orthodox beliefs. Some see the Church organizationally as a means to preserve biblical truth from the changing tides of cultural waves.
The question I want to answer: Are we looking for the right things? Do we want to model with exactitude the cultural form of the early church? Is that the ultimate value?”

Personally, I’ve not been drawn toward the Orthodox faith, but I can see the appeal in a return to the “structure, nature, and expression” of the first century church (or the few centuries after). The difference as I see it though is Continue reading On Hanegraaff and Orthodox Christianity: Or, a Church Service Worth Attending

God help me, I’ve missed social media

Okay, I’ll admit it; I’ve missed social media. Yeah, yeah, yeah, there’s a lot NOT to miss about Facebook, Twitter, blogging, et.al. But one of the things I’ve missed about it is the fodder of ideas it gives me to write about.

Sure, there’s a lot NOT to write about, too. There’s topics that no one wants to engage in because we’re all too busy hoisting the flags of our own opinions. But I’ve missed the inspiration that social media once gave me to examine myself, my beliefs, my truths, and where it is I think those truths and beliefs fit into a world that so desperately needs voices of reason and hope.

One of the things that bugged me most last week, prompting my last post, was a severe case of the “Coulda, Woulda , Shoulda’s”. I let myself get bogged down with all the crap I hadn’t been getting done; being a more committed writer, a more engaged father/husband, a better contributor toward the day-to-day running’s of the house, etc. The weight of the world had settled firmly on my shoulders and I let myself become emotionally and mentally buried. And, yes, I see the irony in admitting this in a post saying I’ve missed social media, but still, I’m just sayin’…

I’ve noticed lately, without the interaction of social media, the artistic muse seems to have flown off to the furthest reaches of my creative imagination. Maybe it’s not the sole reason for my creativity drying up, but it’s certainly played its part. After all, there’s no shortage of prime topics to choose from among the entire world’s opinions on everything from politics to religion to cute kittens to what constitutes “good” music.

I’m also painfully aware that it’s been over eight months since my last book, the non-fiction These Threads of Faith, and a year and a half since The Privilege of Sin. (Admittedly, Kaitlynn just hasn’t wanted to do anything interesting lately, and The Drifter, Nick, just wants to wander back into the forests of Montana and get lost.)

I think, as humans, we are beings born for relationship. Even if that relationship sometimes takes the form of tweets, Snapchats, instant messages, and “likes”. Like anything else, the lure of social media can be abused, but it’s taken its place firmly in our modern-day culture and we’d be better for taking advantage of the positives available through it while remaining mindful of the negatives, the downers, the addictive tendencies, and all that.

So, over the past several weeks, I’ve been making small inroads back onto Facebook (Kent Roberts, Author), I’ve been lurking more and more on Twitter (@AuthorKentR). But, I’ve got to admit, I still don’t see the point of Instagram (thespiritualdrifter).

Like money, potato chips, love and fine whiskey, there is nothing inherently wrong with social media. But, like all of those things and so much more, it can easily be abused by us humans–a species hungry for attention, approval, and affirmation.

And writers are the worst for being clingy and needy like that.

Nonetheless, and BTW…I’ve missed you guys!

Hi, My Name’s Kent and I’m a Snowflake….

snowflakeIn the past, I’ve been accused of this thing called “hypergrace”; of going overboard in such hot button areas as “acceptance” and “inclusion”. It was an accusation I backpedaled from for longer than I care to admit.

But now?
Now I gladly welcome the accusation.
Yes, I practice hypergrace. I suppose these days you’d call me a “snowflake”.

If I’m repeating myself, bear with me…I take this whole “love thy neighbor” thing pretty seriously, as if it were a scriptural truth or something.  Funny how that works.

I posted the above meme on my FB Author page a while ago, and I’ve seen it posted among several others.  I’ve also read some of the comments following these postings.

I’ve read the accusations of “not doing what’s best for our country”, and of “being selfish.”

And yet, since when did compassion become selfish?
When did courage or human rights become something other than the best for our country? Continue reading Hi, My Name’s Kent and I’m a Snowflake….